The Anniversary of My Fifteen Minutes

Well, thirty minutes, if you want to get technical. The length of a standard television game show.

Yes, we’ve reached that day again, the anniversary of my real claim to fame, an appearance on the popular television quiz show Jeopardy!

Being on Jeopardy is just a great experience. You are nervous, you have no idea what to expect. But – and it sounds obvious, but it’s easy to forget – the people who run Jeopardy do this for a living. The professionalism and efficiency is off the charts.

I’m always asked is how I got on. The answer is simple: I tried out. The first part of the tryout is an online quiz – fifty questions. The difficulty level was fairly high, the equivalent of $1200 or $1600 questions during the game. You never find out your score; you either get an email back in a few days with Step Two instructions, or you don’t.

Step Two is a half-day in-person tryout. I was lucky, they were in New York, scheduled in a hotel literally across the street from my office. You arrive and the Jeopardy crew is efficiently working the room. They want to get to know everybody as quickly as possible, trying to find out who will be able handle the bright lights. It’s an exercise in speed-networking; there are 100 contestants against maybe six people from Jeopardy.

You take another test, another fifty questions. Other than the answers being written, it is like the game show; questions read by Alex with the text on a screen. They come fast, and are as difficult as your average $2000 question. Again, you never see your score.

There is then a simulated game, you and two other candidates face about fifteen questions, with buzzers and all. At this point, they are openly filming you; they care if you get the questions right, but also seem mostly interested in how you stand up to the camera.

Then a bit more speed networking, and they send you on your way. You are now “in the pool.” They will either call you or they won’t. A few months later, I got the call.

You go to Los Angeles on your own dime; my filming was in January, so easy sell to get me from NYC to SoCal. My then-fiancée, parents and brother joined; we made a weekend out of it. Just because you made the trip, you are not guaranteed to be on Jeopardy. I think this is just the team there being overly cautious, but the whole enterprise is at your own risk.

On my day in the studio, they were filming five episodes – so it’s gotta run like clockwork. No, you don’t hang out with Alex Trebek. He has his own dressing room, behind where he walks on stage. Contestants have their green room, well-stocked with pastries and coffee, off to the right (viewers’ perspective). They put makeup on you, do your hair – chat you up to help you get comfortable. They go through the rules down to minute details. For example, if your electric pen doesn’t work for Final Jeopardy, there is a plain old index card with a plain old pen, helpfully placed on your podium.

But this whole time you still don’t know if you are going on. There are say twelve people there and only ten slots on the show (two per game plus the returning champion). When your name gets called, you have about ten minutes before you go on stage. If you are the fifth filming of the day – like me –you are nervous as all hell.

I’m also always asked how I prepared. There is no way to study the material for Jeopardy. It would take years; I had six weeks once I knew my filming date. Don’t read the encyclopedia. If you haven’t already memorized all the Presidents, State Capitols and Shakespearean plays – well, you have no business getting this far. You do need to study the strategy for Final Jeopardy wagers and probably also want a plan in advance for Daily Doubles.

The game moves fast, much faster than at home. There are no breaks, it’s question to question to question, around the board and back. When the home audience gets a commercial break, you get a break. You get more makeup, the lights are bright so you are probably sweating a bit. Alex does the chat with the contestants – these are longer in person, they edit them for the show. Before you know it, it’s Double Jeopardy and Final Jeopardy and you won or you lost. You take a deep breath, you are exhausted. And that’s it – once you’ve been a contestant, you can never be on again (under current rules at least).

For a bit of fun, I’m going to do a quick run through of some of the questions from my game. If you go to my player page at Jeopardy Archive, I answered 11 right, 0 wrong. Unfortunately, when you get the big one at the end wrong, it’s unlikely you get invited back. My opponents were Brian (returning champ) and KC – both super nice.

  • Question 2: United Farm Workers president Arturo Rodriguez' father-in-law was this man who died in 1993

The second question and my first time buzzing in. I didn’t “know” the answer, but it was a $400 question, so it’s will be fairly easy. How many people can you name involved with the UFW? Correct question: Who is Cesar Chavez. Result: $400 to me (total score: $400)

  • Question 5: Jefferson Davis’ [father-in-law] was this US President

Remember how fast the game is. Even if you know the Presidents backwards and forward, there is not enough time to use logic and figure out a question like this. Six years older and wiser, I’m frustrated to have missed this one. Correct question: Who is Zachary Taylor. Result: Triple Stumper.

  • Question 16: In 2010 she got engaged to a choreographer she met on the set of "Black Swan"

Yup, I got quiet there for a while. I was trying to buzz in on “plump”, “equine” and “neutron” (category: Same First and Last Letter), but apparently I needed “Celebrity Facts” to get my timing on. Fortunately, I’d just seen this movie. Correct question: Who is Natalie Portman. Result: $200 to me, total score $600.

  • Question 17: Alice Cooper's Phoenix eatery has dishes named for ballplayers & is named this, like the Hall of Fame site

  • Question 20: Angelina Jolie's uncle, Chip